Monthly Archives: August 2017

Vexing Links (8/12/17)

Check them out:

  1. My review of Jaworski’s Structure and the Metaphysics of Mind: How Hylomorphism Solves the Mind-Body Problem is on JBTS.
  2. Paul Draper has updated the “Atheism and Agnosticism” page on the SEP.
  3. Koji Tanaka has co-authored an excellent article on “Paraconsistent Logic” along with Graham Priest and Zach Weber on the SEP.
  4. Plantinga’s EAAN in a nutshell
  5. New article on “Religious Language” on the SEP
  6. Josh Rasmussen’s Worldview Design is one of my new favorite YouTube channels.
  7. New interviews of Eleonore Stump are on Closer to Truth: 1) Do Heaven and Hell Really Exist? 2) What is God’s Eternity? 3) What are Persons? 4) Do Persons have Souls?
  8. Alex Wallo explains the difference between Classical Theism and Theistic Personalism
  9. Pruss says that Naturalists should be Aristotelians (I agree).
  10. Read the first chapter of Justin Brierley’s Unbelievable? the Book.

A quick argument that I’ve been thinking about:

P1) There is a real distinction between metaphysical and nomological modalities.

P2) If there is a real distinction between metaphysical and nomological modalities, there is a metaphysically necessary, non-natural, indeterministic explanation that makes the distinction between metaphysical and nomological modalities intelligible.

P3) If there is a metaphysically necessary, non-natural, indeterministic explanation that makes the distinction between metaphysical and nomological modalities intelligible, then God exists.

C) God exists.

Some fun memes:




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Wagering on Free Will

If you don’t think the evidence can decide the question on free will, you might run a wager style argument, as some studies have suggested that belief in free will encourages moral behavior (Vohs KD, et al. Psychol Sci. 2008). 

Ah, but you object that wager-style arguments cannot motivate belief because you think doxastic voluntarism is false. Well, give it a shot and try to believe on the basis of this wager. And if you succeed, you will have more than pragmatic reasons for holding your belief. As William James puts it, “[t]here are… cases where a fact cannot come at all unless a preliminary faith exists in its coming” (The Will to Believe, 1896).

Belief in free will may be just the sort of belief that verifies itself, if one is able to believe in it while admitting the evidence isn’t sufficient on its own to compel belief.  If one chooses to believe because one thinks it is not a possibility closed off by science, and assesses the merits of the belief from pragmatic concerns, then one has the sort of first-person experience of freedom that libertarians tout even in the face of Libet tests.

In other words, see if you can bring yourself to believe in free will by wagering on it, and thus experiencing direct evidence of doxastic voluntarism, i.e. direct control over your own beliefs.

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